CH-149 Cormorant

Aircraft
Overview

The CH-149 Cormorant is a long-range helicopter dedicated to search and rescue. It can operate in severe conditions, making it ideal for Canada’s challenging geography and climate.

The Cormorant can carry up to 12 stretchers or a load of 5,000 kilograms. Its advanced systems provide a stable hover for critical hoisting operations. It has helped rescue mountain climbers, lost hikers, shipcrews and more.

Length 22.8 m
Rotor span 18.5 m
Height 6.5 m
Maximum gross weight 14,600 kg
Maximum speed 277 km/h
Range 1,000+ km
Locations
  • Comox, B.C.
  • Gander, N.L.
  • Greenwood, N.S.
This aircraft is used for Search and rescue

News

Parents with five young children

Home in time for dinner: A Christmas of gratitude for family of 442 Squadron flood rescue crew

“Daddy rescue people on mountain? Good job Daddy.” It’s a question only a three-year-old child can ask. Repeat three times and that’s what Kelly-Lynn Nicole’s triplet boys kept asking the day 442 Search and Rescue Squadron rescued more than 300 people and their pets last month.
December 16, 2021

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Op Lentus - Aviator Elsa Gilroy Air Operations Support Technician

On Monday, 15 November 2021, when 442 (Transport and Rescue) Squadron from Comox, British Columbia, deployed a CH-149 Cormorant helicopter on a domestic operations mission it had an unusual crew member on board. The Op LENTUS mission was launched to airlift more than 300 stranded motorists on a washed out portion of Highway 7 in the small community of Agassiz, BC.
December 13, 2021

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Comox Reservist Contributes to Squadron’s Largest Evacuation in Decades

On Monday, 15 November 2021, when 442 (Transport and Rescue) Squadron from Comox, British Columbia, deployed a CH-149 Cormorant helicopter on a domestic operations mission it had an unusual crew member on board. The Op LENTUS mission was launched to airlift more than 300 stranded motorists on a washed out portion of Highway 7 in the small community of Agassiz, BC.
December 13, 2021

A man in front of a helicopter

Iceland and Wall Street and Helipads, oh my!

For Major Peter Wright, every SAR mission where there is a life saved, as well as every failure experienced, contribute to making him better. “Whether it is the 1st or 200th SAR mission, the feeling you have when you are able to bring a loved one home or to a higher level of care resulting in a life saved, is truly amazing.”
June 29, 2021

Two men in orange coveralls lean on a bunk in an aircraft.

Woods hike not the ideal SAR

A ten-hour walking rescue tests the mettle of RCAF SAR Techs.
September 14, 2020

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